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What are the Top Healthcare Industry Challenges in 2017?

What are the Top Healthcare Industry Challenges in 2017? | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

Healthcare Industry challenges are always going to be evolving alongside the breakthroughs and innovations. In 2017, there are new healthcare industry challenges that go alongside the age-old difficulties.

For doctors, nurses and medical teams, here are 7 of the key healthcare industry challenges they are currently facing in the year ahead for 2017.

1) Retail Care offering increased access

Retail giants like CVS and Walgreens are pushing further into care delivery, continuing to put pressure on traditional providers to increase access to care.

According to Laura Jacobs, writing for Hospitals and Health Networks “The greatest challenge for most organizations will be finding the right pace for adapting to or embracing new [healthcare] payment models.”

Doctors will be required to step up their efforts to optimize the patient experience, beyond measuring patient satisfaction.

2) Behavioral healthcare

The healthcare industry is starting to recognize that Mental Health is important to the well-being of employees and consumers, according to a report from PWC.

The report notes that one out of five American adults experiences a mental illness every year. These conditions cost businesses more than $440 billion each year. Healthcare organizations and employers will look at behavioral care as ‘key to keeping costs down, productivity up and consumers healthy’ the report said.


3) Meaningful Use and Value Based Payments

Eligible providers and eligible hospitals are continuing to work on meaningful use of EHRs.

Value-based purchasing programs are solidly in place, and eligible physicians are starting to experience the penalty phase of CMS’s quality reporting and Meaningful Use initiatives. In fact, CMS revealed that more than 257,000 eligible professional providers who are not meaningful users of certified EHR technology would have their Medicare Fee Schedule cut by one percent.

Eligible physicians also need to comply with CMS’s new Value-Based Payment Modifier program, or face penalties. It’s part of Medicare’s efforts to improve healthcare, but the program adds yet more regulations physicians need to monitor.

All these changes and new reporting requirements can become overwhelming for already busy physicians, which is why the American Medical Association has repeatedly asked for relief.


4) Switching to ICD-10

The much anticipated and maligned change to ICD10 codes in 2015 led to a lot of discomfort for physicians. The increase in codes from 14,000 to 68,000 means a lot of diagnosis criteria must be re-learned.

There is a great deal of planning, re-training and new systems that go along with the upgrade in codes. For doctors, finding the time to do this proved to be a huge challenge, and still is.

5) Data Security

Patient privacy issues, including concerns about data breaches, continue to be a challenge for providers, payers, and consumers.

Providers and payers will need to be aware of the best practices for data security to avoid the type of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) violations that can negatively impact an organization.


6) Managing Patient volume

While new payment models will are aiming to reduce acute hospital utilization, the continued expansion of Medicaid and the insured population through the public exchanges will seemingly keep demand up.

The rise of obesity and chronic disease and population aging are creating a demand for medical services like never before.

Emergency departments will continue to be overworked until efforts to decant volume through urgent care, better care management or redesigned primary care models begins to take effect..


7) Implementing Telemedicine

The idea of a doctor seeing you via a computer screen may no longer be new, but the adoption of the Telemedicine services by doctors with their own patients is still a struggle.

The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation shares a vision of how Telemedicine can reduce patient backlogs. “Imagine a world where patients in rural areas far from a nearby doctor can easily find a health care provider to consult with online from the comfort of their own homes; where doctors living in Pennsylvania can help reduce the backlog of patients waiting to see doctors in Mississippi; and where patients can connect to a doctor over the Internet for routine medical purposes with a few clicks of the mouse—like they do when ordering a book on Amazon.”

Finding a balance between in person visits and telemedicine will require doctors to adjust their approach to care. Learning to diagnose remotely also requires new skills and detailed reporting.

Of course, Healthcare Industry Challenges are nothing new. Technology and legislation will continue to change the landscape. Doctors and their medical teams must evolve their approach and focus to meet them.

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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80 Percent Of Patients Worry For Health Data Security

80 Percent Of Patients Worry For Health Data Security | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

Though 2015 will begin to show the U.S. health industry as a “true market” a new report indicates consumers remain concerned about medical technology and the security of their health information and data.

A new report released today at the Forbes Healthcare Summit by PwC’s Health Research Institute shows U.S. patients concerned about the digital age, according to a survey of 1,000 U.S. consumers who were interviewed. The report comes as millions more Americans are gaining health coverage under the Affordable Care Act and the $2.8 trillion U.S. health care sector undergoes major transformation.

Nearly 70 percent of those who responded say they are concerned about health data via their smart phones and 78 percent are concerned about medical data security in general, PwC’s report, linked here, shows.

Despite these concerns, however, PwC’s report indicates consumers are ready to take more charge of their health care and so-called “do-it-yourself” healthcare working with doctors and other providers who will assist them with care in the home and other remote patient-monitoring, the survey indicates.

“Established healthcare companies and new entrants are rapidly developing cost-efficient products and services tailored directly to consumers,” said Kelly Barnes, PwC partner and US health industries leader.

Consumers are ready for medical care providers other than physicians to deliver their care, which is good news for companies like Walgreen WAG -0.67% (WAG), CVS Health (CVS), Wal-Mart (WMT) and others. PwC said 75 percent of their survey respondents were open to “extenders” like pharmacists and nurse practitioners delivering their care.



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Top cybersecurity predictions of 2015 - ZDNet

Top cybersecurity predictions of 2015 - ZDNet | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

As noted by Websense, healthcare data is valuable. Not only are companies such as Google, Samsung and Apple tapping into the industry, but the sector itself is becoming more reliant on electronic records and data analysis. As such, data stealing campaigns targeting hospitals and health institutions are likely to increase in the coming year.



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Vicente Pastor's curator insight, December 6, 2014 10:26 AM

I am a bit skeptic about predictions in general. Anyway, it is always a good exercise thinking about the coming trends although we do not need to wait for the "artificial" change of year since threats are continuously evolving.

Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology's curator insight, December 9, 2014 4:57 PM

Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology