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10 Great Gadgets for Tech-Savvy Doctors

10 Great Gadgets for Tech-Savvy Doctors | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

As technology continuously innovates how we deal with healthcare everyday, it’s vital that doctors stay up to date on new trends. Many of the latest gadgets not only provide great value but are also fun. Here’s our list of 10 tech gadgets for doctors to use at their practice:

1. Digital Stethoscope

The cold, hard stethoscopes that doctors use have now been greatly upgraded. Now, the digital stethoscope is one of the smallest, yet powerful stethoscopes in the world. It’s so small that it fits right in the palm of your hands but can amplify over 100 times. It’s plug and play compatible making it easy for doctors to hear via their headphones or earplugs. It also connects via smartphone, tablet, or computer to record info right into the patient’s EMR!

2. Google Glass

Google seems to have their hands in just about every new piece of technology. Google Glass is a wearable spectacle that’s perfect for many industries. Doctors can enjoy the ease of accessing their patients’ records, collaborating what they are viewing with other doctors via surgery, and checking patients’ vitals. Though Google halted sales of Glass on 15 Jan 2015, many vendors have created specialized software applications & continue to supply the device, and Google itself is reportedly working on a successor.

3. AV300 Vein Viewing System

Doctors can easily examine their patients closely with the AccuVein AV300 Vein Viewing System. This handy gadget makes viewing clumps and other issues with veins simple. It’s lightweight and small, so doctors can carry it around room to room. Since it doesn’t come in contact with the patient, it does not need a protective covering or to be sterilized.

4. EarlySense System 

The EarlySense Proactive enables doctors and their medical staff to capture all a patients vitals in the exam room. Everything from their heart rate to their respiratory rate can be quickly captured and transferred to the EMR system. This not only reduces the time of transferring patient’s room to room, but also reduces mistakes of recording incorrect readings.

5. VScan by GE

Another helpful examination gadget is the GE VScan. The VScan is a pocket-sized ultrasound, allowing doctors to access many systems of the body including the abdominal, cardiac, urology, fetal, thoracic and others. This device helps speed decisions doctors normally would need to make after receiving x-rays. Unnecessary testing is also reduced.

6. Infrared Thermometer

Gone are the days of ten second readouts and probe-covers. Infrared thermometers now give accurate temperatures in one second, with no contact required. They are small and require just AAA batteries. These are perfect to use for fussy children. The Rediscan thermometer (pictured) can also measure the temperature of objects such as milk bottles or bath water.

7. Wacom Intuos

The Wacom Intuos system instantly converts what you write into a digitally readable format. It consists of a tablet which is basically a touch-sensitive pad (without a screen) and a stylus. Doctors can write clinical notes, prescriptions and draw directly on x-rays and charts. The information is digital, and can plug in directly into an EMR system. This method enables doctors to keep all data private as well, without paperwork lying around for others to see.

8. AliveCor ECG monitor

The AliveCor ECG system consists of a heart monitor device that connects to a smartphone app. Patients use it to record their ECG reading, which can be shared with their doctor and integrated into the PHR (patient health record). Doctors use the physician app to monitor patients’ ECGs remotely.  The physician app can also analyse readings and detect aberrations like AF (atrial fibrillation) automatically. Doctors can view trends, act promptly in case of an emergency, and integrate the readings into the patient’s EMR from their end as well.

9. Fitbit

The famous Fitbit is an activity tracker and monitoring device that doctors can suggest to patients to stay fit. It provides motivational tips and helps patients lead a healthy lifestyle. Not only patients, but doctors can also use a Fitbit themselves and practice what they preach! There are many activity trackers on the market, and doctors must try out devices themselves to evaluate their efficacy.

10. Adheretech’s Smart Pill Container

Smart pill containers are not used directly by doctors, but they are an excellent way for doctors to monitor their patient’s prescriptions taken. These containers emit light and sound alerting patients when it’s time to take their medication. If the dosage is skipped, an alert is sent to the caregiver or patient.

A lot of these gadgets are not easily available in India, but you can definitely pick them up in your next visit abroad. Do share this post with your colleagues (and patients) if you found it useful!

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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5 Amazing Health IT Trends In 2016 

5 Amazing Health IT Trends In 2016  | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

As we look back upon 2015, we can reflect, review and based on that and other factors, make some predictions about what next year will bring us. John Halamka had an interesting postthat reflect on the bigger challenges, such as ICD-10, the Accountable Care Act and its implications on data analytics, the HIPAA omnibus rule and its impact on cybersecurity and audits and the emergence of the Cloud as a viable option in healthcare. We can expect to see some of these trends continue and grow in 2016. So based on these key learnings from 2015, here are a few predictions for 2016.

 

 

Cybersecurity will become even more important

 

In 2015, insurers and medical device manufacturers got a serious wake up call about the importance and cost of cybersecurity lapses. Healthcare data will increasingly be looked at as strategic data because we can always get a new credit card but since diagnoses cannot change, the possibilities of misuse are significant. Just as the financial industry has settled on PCI as the standard, expect the healthcare industry to get together to define and promote a standard and an associated certification. HITRUST appears to be the leader and recent announcements are likely to further cement it as the healthcare security standard. Given all that, one can safely expect spending on cybersecurity to increase.

 

 

IoT will get a dose of reality

 

The so-called Internet of Things has been undergoing a boom of late. However, the value from it, especially as applied to quantifiable improvement in patient outcomes or improved care has been lacking. Detractors point out that the quantified-self movement while valuable, self selects the healthiest population and doesn’t do much to address the needs of older populations suffering from multiple chronic diseases. Expect to see more targeted IoT solutions such as that offered by those like Propeller Health that focus on specific conditions, have clear value propositions, savings, and offer more than just a device. Expect some moves from Fitbit and others who have raised lots of recent cash in terms of new product announcements and possible acquisitions.

 

 

Interoperability will become a business requirement

 

No matter the point of view on value or benefits of EHRs, the fact remains that EHRs are here to stay. And because the information is now electronic, the promise of easy data exchange should be a reality. That is, however, not the case. Realizing that EHRs cannot solve all problems, health systems anticipate working with external vendors to fill the “white space” in the EHR solution suites. This implies that integration is now a business requirement. Add to it innovations like outcomes based agreements between pharma companies and health systems, and the evolution of modern approaches such as FHIR, 2016 is likely to be the year of significant progress in interoperability.

 

 

Telemedicine will grow rapidly

 

With a looming shortage of general physicians and the uneven distribution of specialists across the country, telemedicine has a clear value proposition. And its flexibility allows for it to be applied to acute conditions such asstroke, simpler conditions such as flu and strep, specialities such as dermatology, pediatrics and even private conditions such as sexually transmitted infection (STI.) Millennials are comfortable with this approach, so are seniors and others with more severe conditions who don’t want to trek to the nearest hospital for care.

 

 

Specialty EHRs will boom

 

This YouTube video is hilarious and a simultaneously sad, but perception of the impact that EHR implementations have had on care. Physicians and nurses aren’t fans of EHRs despite being the target audience. A one-size-fits all approach to product development and a primary focus on billing rather than patient care is at the root cause of this problem. Innovative companies have taken this fight on but intelligently, have focused their attention on creating EHRs tailor made to specialties such as dermatology, plastic surgery, pain management etc. Since these are significant revenue drivers for health systems and the specialists using it swear by them, we can expect adoption to boom in 2016. This will also lead to increased demand around interoperability and the ability to connect to any EHR via API.

Healthcare is a $2.1 trillion industry so the above should obviously be considered only a small set of possible trends in healthcare IT, but things like interoperability and security have wide ranging implications. Those two in particular will be universally applicable across all of healthcare.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com/tdr

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Going From Paper To Paperless 

Going From Paper To Paperless  | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it
Can Your Office Truly Be A Paperless Office?

Although many of us dream of a truly paperless office, the reality is that our world still revolves in large part around information printed onto physical documents. And even with a sizable number of medical practices transitioning to electronic medical records every year, most have still not taken the plunge (and, at this rate, may never do so). So when correspondence is received from an ‘analog’ practice, that paperwork must be converted to a digital format.

 

I’ll discuss some options for scanning equipment below but it is important to realize that the physical act ofscanning is only part of the process of digitization of paper documents. A real person, usually with at least a basic clinical understanding, must categorize and organize the scanned files into their proper place: within the right patient’s chart, within the right folder, and perhaps with the right tags or labels.

Scanning options For Small Practices 

A small medical practice may be able to use a consumer level scanner. If you use EMR, you’ll need a way to get the scanned files into the patient records, and then someone will need to put the files in their proper place. These should be sheet-fed scanners, not the flat-bed type of scanners used for copying books and bulky objects; the latter would be painfully slow way to scan paper documents.

 

NeatDesk scanner  This is a nicely-designed scanner with included proprietary software that can scan documents, business cards, and receipts – using three different chutes – and automatically categorize them into different folders. If you don’t want to think too much when scanning, the software can do the work for you; however, I found it a little too inflexible.

 

Also, the auto image adjustment that straightens images that were scanned crooked is usually needed because the central rollers don’t consistently pull documents straight through. NeatDesk has recently added the ability to scan to Dropbox.

 

Fujitsu ScanSnap ix500 This has become my scanner of choice for the home office. It always pulls documents through straight and does so quickly. Unlike the NeatDesk, it does not have separate chutes for cards and receipts, so the guides have to be adjusted manually for those. But consistently straight scans makes up for that.

 

Another cool feature is the ability to scan directly to your phone or iPad via a wireless connection, in addition to Dropbox or email. I use this device to scan every piece of paper I receive, from bills to magazine articles to receipts (before shredding them).

Document scanning services

For those practices that are overwhelmed with the sheer volume of paperwork that needs to be scanned, the services of a document scanning company can be employed. They can be especially helpful in the beginning of EMR conversion, to give the practice a running start.

 

They can either simply scan paper documents into digital files or facilitate the actual conversion of paper patient charts directly into their electronic medical records. Some medical practices continue using their paper records and then scan them into a digital format at the end of each day, foregoing the EMR system altogether. While this is technically an electronic record of the document, realize that this is not a true electronic medical record system and thus would not qualify for Meaningful Use incentives.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com/tdr

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