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Providers Looking for More out of HIEs

Providers Looking for More out of HIEs | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

Healthcare providers’ health information exchange (HIE) needs have moved beyond connecting disparate systems and meeting meaningful requirements. They are now looking for HIEs to ease access to “actionable” data, according to a report from NORC at the University of Chicago.


The researchers conducted an in-depth examination consisting of site visits and 37 semi-structured discussions in six states (Iowa, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Utah, Vermont, and Wyoming) in the early months of 2014 to understand provider perspectives on the state HIE program and their experiences with electronic exchange. The report was funded by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC).


The report found that providers highlight the potential for HIE to ease access to actionable data that integrates data from across the care continuum and provides clinicians with information at the point of care to improve care delivery and care coordination. Providers highlighted several exchange priorities: admission, discharge, transfer (ADT) alerts, services that facilitate care coordination, and interstate exchange.


Additionally, meaningful use and payment reform are creating new requirements for health IT-enabled information sharing related to care coordination and management as well as new models for patient care. Providers anticipate a growing need for vendor provided HIE services and infrastructure as expectations for electronic exchange of health information increase under this shift, the report found.


Providers also encountered various challenges, specifically competing priorities, issues managing multiple funding streams, lack of qualified staff on the provider side, and difficulty obtaining adequate support from electronic health record (EHR) and HIE vendors. They also noted a need for interoperable systems to meet exchange and health system reform goals.


What’s more, providers in most states believed that the state HIE program contributed to building awareness around HIE and the benefits of exchanging information. Providers conveyed a general sentiment that a state-based HIE effort is important, due to their stature as neutral entity, capable of bringing stakeholders together. Even though the meaningful use program did not provide incentive payments to long-term care and behavioral health providers, the state HIE program was instrumental in engaging these providers, identifying their specific needs and the gaps that grantees needed to fill, particularly around care continuity, the report revealed.


The researchers concluded, “Throughout the life of the program, HIE has become more visible and better established, meaning that provider priorities and challenges have likewise evolved.” In addition to highlighting providers’ current needs and perspectives on HIE, findings from these conversations emphasize certain areas, the researchers said:

  • Providers have additional use cases beyond meaningful use and payment reform they are or would like to pursue to meet their specific exchange needs.
  • New healthcare system priorities, such as care coordination suggest expanding interoperable health IT systems and services to providers in eligible for meaningful use to ensure that the information needed to manage care is available electronically.
  • There is a need to push for interoperability at the vendor level.
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Top Health Industries Issues for 2015 « Healthcare Economist

What are the top health industry issues for 2015?  A PwC report believes the following 10 issues should top the list:

HRI’s top 10 issues for the health industry in the year ahead:

  1. Do-it-yourself healthcare. U.S. physicians and consumers are ready to embrace a dramatic expansion of the high-tech, personal medical kit. Wearable technology, smartphone-linked devices and mobile apps will become increasingly valuable in care delivery.
  2. Making the leap from mobile app to medical device. A proliferation of approved and portable medical devices in patients’ homes, and on their phones, makes diagnosis and treatment more convenient, redoubling the need for strong information security systems.
  3. Balancing privacy and convenience. Privacy will lose ground to convenience in 2015 as patients adopt digital tools and services that gather and analyze health information.
  4. High-cost patients spark cost-saving innovations. The soaring cost of care for Medicare and Medicaid “dual eligibles,” aging boomers and patients with co-morbidities will foster creative care delivery and management systems.
  5. Putting a price on positive outcomes. With high-priced new products and specialty drugs slated to hit the market in 2015 increasing demand for new evidence and definitions of positive health outcomes are expected.
  6. Open everything to everyone. New transparency initiatives targeting clinical trial data, real-world patient outcomes and financial relationships between physicians and pharmaceutical companies will improve patient care and open new opportunities.
  7. Getting to know the newly insured. 2015 will be a revelatory year for the U.S. health sector as a portrait of the newly-insured emerges, fostering better care management programs and shifting marketing strategies.
  8. Physician extenders see an expanded role in patient care. Physician “extenders” are becoming the first line of care for many patients, as doctors delegate tasks, monitor patients digitally and enter into risk-based payment models.
  9. Redefining health and well-being for the millennial generation. As the economy rebounds and baby boomers retire, employers and insurers look for fresh ways to engage, retain and attract the next generation of health consumers.
  10. Partner to win. In 2015, joint ventures, open collaboration platforms and non-traditional partnerships will push healthcare companies out of the comfort zone toward new competitive strategies.



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