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How to Meet HIPAA Compliance Requirements

How to Meet HIPAA Compliance Requirements | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

A Revolutionary Approach to HIPAA Compliance

We all know that meeting the requirements set forth in the HIPAA compliance policy is mandatory for any healthcare, medical records, insurance, or other healthcare-related business. Securing individuals’ electronic protected health information (ePHI) is the most critical step to complying with HIPAA.

 

Yet this is often easier said than done, especially when you consider the high number of complex requirements that must be met in order to prove compliance.

The challenges of abiding by the “Security Rule”

For example, one of the most critical items on any HIPAA compliance checklist is meeting the Security Standards for the Protection of Electronic Health Information. Commonly referred to as the “Security Rule,” this requirement establishes a national set of security standards for protecting certain health information that is held or transferred in electronic form.

The Security Rule addresses the technical and non-technical safeguards that organizations referred to “covered entities” must put in place to secure individuals’ ePHI. All covered entities must assess their security risks, even those entities who utilize certified electronic health record (EHR) technology. Those entities must put in place administrative, physical and technical safeguards to maintain compliance with the Security Rule, and document every security compliance measure.

Related: Sorry for the Inconvenience – The Breaches Just Keep Coming (and so do the Ramifications)

CSPi’s HIPAA compliance solutions

If all of this sounds intimidating, we have some good news: CSPi’s security solutions are uniquely suited to address the requirements specified in the Security Rule (and in turn, to help you stay HIPAA compliant).

Our ARIA Software-Defined Security (SDS) solution and applications help healthcare organizations protect the security of individuals’ ePHI information with powerful tools and capabilities required to:

  • Know and prove what ePHI records were accessed (if any) through:

    • The automatic detection of intrusion or unauthorized access.
    • Continual and complete monitoring of ePHI data as it moves through the network (including east-west traffic), and is accessed throughout the environment.
    • The ability to stop or disrupt incidents that could lead to potential disclosure.
    • Block or redirect identified data conversations with ePHI repositories and provide the auditable documented detail of measures take to maintain HIPAA compliance.
    • Prevent unauthorized access of customer data through the use of encryption that can be applied on a per-customer basis.

Working in conjunction with ARIA, our nVoy Series provides additional proof of HIPAA compliance with:

  • Automated breach verification and notification, critical to giving healthcare organizations a better way to comply.
  • Detailed and complete HIPAA compliance reports, including recordings of all conversations involving ePHI.
  • Auditable proof of the exact impact of data breach, including:
    • What devices are involved and to what degree?
    • When did the breach start and when did it end?
    • What critical databases or files were accessed?
    • Who did the intruder talk to?

Visit CSPi at HIMSS19 in the Cybersecurity Command Center Booth 400, Kiosk 91.

Interested in learning more about CSPi, including how our innovative security tools are helping today’s healthcare leaders achieve compliance with HIPAA? Make your plans to visit with us at the upcoming HIMSS conference, or visit www.cspi.com, to learn more about our HIPAA compliance programs.

About CSPi

CSPi is a leading cybersecurity firm that has been solving security challenges since 1968. Our security solutions take a radically different approach to enterprise-wide data security by focusing on the data at its source, securing DevOps applications and leveraging network traffic for actionable insights. CSPI’s ARIA SDS platform uses a simple automated approach to protect any organization’s critical data, including PII/PHI, on-premise and in public clouds, no matter if is in use, in transit, or at rest. Our Myricom® nVoy Series appliances provide compliance assurance, automated breach verification and network monitoring enabled by the 10G dropless packet capture capabilities of our Myricom® ARC intelligent adapters. To learn more about how our cybersecurity products can help you with data privacy regulation compliance, check out our how-to guide, “Successfully Complying with Data Privacy Regulations.”

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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Big Data in Healthcare: A Cause for Concern?

Big Data in Healthcare: A Cause for Concern? | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

A federal advisory panel has kicked off discussions about the privacy and security challenges related to the use of big data in healthcare, with a goal of making policy recommendations in the coming weeks.


During the Jan. 12 meeting of the Health IT Policy Committee's Privacy and Security Workgroup - formerly called the Tiger Team - members began sorting through a number of key big data themes that emerged from two public hearings the group hosted in December. The workgroup and the committee will make recommendations to the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, which could ultimately lead to new policies from the Department of Health and Human Services.


Last month's hearings included testimony from a number of stakeholders from various segments of the healthcare sector. For instance, testimony highlighted that while analyzing big data can bring big potential benefits, including better treatment outcomes and lower costs, it also can bring privacy risks to individuals, says workgroup Chair Deven McGraw, an attorney at the law firm Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP.

The workgroup will now help to assess whether the nation has the right policy framework in place "in order to maximize what is good about what health data presents for us, while addressing the concerns that are raised," McGraw says.

Big Data Challenges

Big data concerns that emerged from the hearings in December included whether various "tools" that are commonly used to help protect an individual's health data privacy are sufficient, given the complexities of various big data use cases, McGraw says.

Those "tools" include data de-identification methods; patient consent; transparency to patients and consumers about how their data might be used; various practices related to data collection, use and purpose; and security measures to protect data.

Other concerns arising from the testimony that the workgroup plans to dig into relate to the legal landscape, such as whether there are regulatory gaps in HIPAA and other laws regarding keeping health data used for big data analytics private.

The workgroup, which will continue its discussion on Jan. 26, will also consider the harm that could be caused if big data is not kept private, including discrimination, medical identity theft, and mistrust of the healthcare system.

In early February, however, the workgroup will temporarily shift gears to discuss ONC's 10-year interoperability roadmap, which is expected to be released in late January. The roadmap will focus on secure health data exchange.

Nevertheless, the workgroup hopes to hammer out some preliminary findings or early recommendations about protecting big data so that it can make a presentation at the March 10 meeting of the HIT Policy Committee, McGraw says.


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