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Phone Systems that keep the Practice and Patient Connected 

Phone Systems that keep the Practice and Patient Connected  | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

Today’s medical practice office is increasingly concerned with patient satisfaction. Of course, the health and well-being of patients has always been a concern; but as revenue and billing cycles quickly shift to a larger percent of patient responsibility, it’s becoming important to focus on ways to keep the conversation between practice and patient open and customer-centric at all times.

 

Healthcare providers have begun looking to technology solutions to up their patient satisfaction game. One likely solution? Automated phone systems that keep the practice and patient connected. Here’s a look at some of the key pros and cons of using automated phone systems in healthcare.

 

Everyone can relate to being annoyed by automated phone systems that keep directing callers around in circles, never to reach a human voice. That experience doesn’t translate to high patient appreciation. But it’s important to note that a good automated phone system can be far easier to use and more personalized for your practice needs.

 

Pros of Automated Phone Systems

 

Save Money. Automated phone systems have the potential to cover all of the work of your standard receptionist. Calls can be directed to the right party fairly quickly and the practice is still saving on the man hours it takes to answer and direct those calls manually.


Easy Installation and Upkeep. Most phone systems can be installed and up and running in a short amount of time and they can be hosted by the provider, meaning that the office will not need to worry about troubleshooting problems.


Routing Calls. New systems are exceptionally advanced and calls can easily be routed to the right destination, as well as voicemail boxes.


Setting Up Call Options. If the office manager takes a good look at what patients generally call about, they can narrow down specific options so that callers are quickly directed to the right location. For instance, if the largest number of calls come in to schedule appointments, “Scheduling” should be the first item on the automated list.


Cons of Automated Phone Systems

 

Patient Approval. No matter how well designed the phone system is, there will always be patients who are opposed simply because they’ve had bad experiences with automated systems–potentially not even in healthcare, but in another industry altogether. Most patients will get used to a new system, though practices should definitely listen to feedback and adjust to better serve the patients.

 

Voice Recognition Mistakes. Voice recognition is exceptionally useful so that patients can speak their choices and be directed immediately, without punching in any keys. Many people prefer this method, but voice recognition does still have occasional issues in deciphering speech, especially with differing accents.

 

Managers should take some time researching the company and product before deciding on any system. Taking the patients’ needs into consideration can go a long way in making the decision, as well as breeding satisfaction with patients as they become better acquainted with the phone system. Looking to the future of healthcar, technology plays the biggest role in facilitating patient satsifaction.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Text Messages Can Increase Compliance With Taking Medications, Study Finds

Text Messages Can Increase Compliance With Taking Medications, Study Finds | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it
Broad implications for health care providers and insurers

Nearly one third of patients taking medication to lower lipids and control blood pressure are noncompliant with their medications—medications that can be important for preventing progression of coronary artery disease or a preventing a stroke.

Some patients just simply forget to take their medications, or may be uncertain as to the potential benefits or harms.

Increasing compliance with taking medications is one of the most common problems healthcare providers deal with in trying to provide the best care for their patients.

As telemedicine in the US has become a viable method of healthcare, with e-visits becoming more popular, alternatives to traditional in-person visits have expanded ways to influence patient behaviors. Gentle reminders at in-person medical appointments may not be effective or adequate.

With the majority of US residents now owning a cellphone or having access to one, harnessing wireless technology may be a viable way to help reach patients to provide reminders to take medications and intervene when patients are not compliant.

And as smart phones have become more prevalent in our society–with more senior citizens adapting such technology—increasing compliance with taking medicines now becomes just a text message away.
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Dani Li's curator insight, June 5, 2015 5:11 AM

SMS services and mobile apps are such an easy and effective way to improve medication compliance. Who doesn't look at their phone at least once an hour?

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Why You Should Put Down That Tablet Or Phone If You Want Better Sleep

Why You Should Put Down That Tablet Or Phone If You Want Better Sleep | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

If your plans for the New Year include figuring out how to work a little more better-quality sleep into your schedule, here’s one word to remember: Blue. Using electronic devices that emit blue light before bedtime can disturb sleep patterns and deprive you of those precious ZZZZZs your brain and body needs.

Devices that emit blue light include e-readers, tablets, laptops, smart phones and several types of flat screen televisions. The sleep-disturbing effects of blue light—also known as short-wavelength enriched light– have been suspected for quite some time, and new research adds to the scientific evidence counseling us to put down our gadgets well before we hit the pillow.

Researchers from the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston tested the effects of reading an IPad versus reading a paper book before bedtime. Participants used the IPad or book for four hours before bedtime for five consecutive nights. People who read the IPad felt less tired before trying to sleep, spent less time in REM sleep, and produced less of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin.

According to lead study author, Dr. Anne-Marie Chang: “We found the body’s natural circadian rhythms were interrupted by the short-wavelength enriched light, otherwise known as blue light … Participants reading an eBook took longer to fall asleep and had reduced evening sleepiness, reduced melatonin secretion, later timing of their circadian clock and reduced next-morning alertness than when reading a printed book.”

Since more of us are using blue-light emitting devices in the evening, it seems we’re unwittingly short-circuiting our sleep needs despite best intentions.

If you really want to read at night, and aren’t into using old school books, the researchers say that the original e-readers (such as the first generation Kindle readers) are probably fine for the purpose because they do not emit blue light. But any tablet (IPad or other) emits plenty of blue and is liable to disrupt sleep.

If you’re wondering whether you can supplement with melatonin in pill or capsule form to combat sleep deprivation, there’s plenty of evidence that doing so works – but be careful. As with any hormone naturally produced in your body, supplementing too often can disrupt natural production and trigger additional problems. A better policy is to address the issues that are causing sleep deprivation (like using gadgets before bedtime) instead of trying to patch the problem with a pseudo-solution that can eventually become another sort of problem.


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