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Why Cyber-Security Is Important For Your Dental Practice

Why Cyber-Security Is Important For Your Dental Practice | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

If you run a dental practice, keeping your computer systems secure at all times is essential.

 

Due to the increasing frequency and sophistication of cyber-threats, it’s more important than ever to keep your computer systems secure. However, if you’re unsure how to protect your data, you certainly aren’t alone.

 

The data that you store on your computer systems contains highly sensitive information about your patients, which can make it a target of hackers.

 

Not only do these records contain important identifying information of your patients that could be targeted by identity thieves, but they also contain protected medical records that are protected by HIPAA.

 

PROTECTING YOUR DATA REQUIRES MORE THAN AN ANTIVIRUS PROGRAM

 

An effective antivirus program can play a major role in protecting your data and improving dental practice security, but it’s not the whole story.

 

You need to make sure that your employees are trained on how to avoid malware on the web, avoid falling prey to phishing, and are well-educated on the importance of cyber-security.

 

In addition, it’s essential to make sure that your employees are familiar with how to identify suspicious emails and ensure that they avoid clicking on links from an unknown sender.

 

WHAT CAN THREATS & ADVANCEMENTS BE EXPECTED IN THE FUTURE?

 

While cyber-security threats are likely to become more advanced as time goes on, health IT security systems are likely to advance as well, which means that there will be new ways to protect your computer system from hackers.

 

For instance, antivirus programs are becoming increasingly effective at detecting new forms of malware, and many antivirus programs now make it possible to flag websites that could be dangerous.

 

Using a certified EHR or Electronic Health Records system will help keep your patients’ information safe, certified EHRs are tested by the government to make sure it is of the highest security standards.

 

These programs are likely to become far more sophisticated, which is likely to thwart a large portion of cyber-attacks. Furthermore, IT technology is being increasingly utilized for a wide range of dental devices, such as dental cameras, CNC machines, and 3D printers used in the dental industry.

 

As a result, the list of dental devices that you’ll need to keep secure is likely to increase considerably in the future.

 

Luckily, you’ll have the opportunity to protect these smart devices with cyber-security technologies that are more advanced and effective than ever.

Technical Dr. Inc.s insight:
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Health IT outsourcing poised for growth in 2015, beyond

Health IT outsourcing poised for growth in 2015, beyond | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

The market for IT outsourcing in healthcare and life sciences is expected increase at an 8.6 percent compound annual growth rate through 2019, with the adoption of cloud-based services among the major trends, according to global research firm TechNavio.

Organizations might be outsourcing just a few applications or their whole IT operations, relying on managed services to eliminate the need for an in-house IT staff. IT outsourcing helps healthcare providers to deploy business applications rapidly and focus on their core business.

Hospitals and clinics, which have difficulty keeping with up myriad changing government regulations, tend to outsource applications related to operations, finance, database management and infrastructure, according to the report. This outsourcing helps to reduce operational and maintenance costs.

The report also points to the rise in use of predictive and content analytics for clinical and operational insights.

By 2020, 80 percent of healthcare data will pass through the cloud at some point in its lifetime as providers increasingly turn to the cloud for data collection, aggregation, analytics and decision-making, IDC Health Insights recently predicted.

IDC also estimated that half of health and life science buyers by 2018 will demand substantial risk sharing with their outsourcing partners.

Hospitals increasingly plan to outsource coding efforts in the coming year, according to a survey published by Black Book Rankings, which found in a separate survey that a majority of hospital CFOs plan to either outsource or purchase new revenue cycle management software by the end of 2015.

Dick Escue, CIO of Valley View Hospital in Colorado, made the case for buying effective services, not mega-expensive hardware, in a November article published at Becker's Health IT & CIO Review.

Yet Peter Odegard, information security officer at Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, told FierceHealthIT that it's increasingly difficult for hospitals to keep track of all the vendor partners that host, store or analyze data, adding to the complexity of security patient data.


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Information Security Risk Management

Information Security Risk Management | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

Information security risk management is a wide topic, with many notions, processes, and technologies that are often confused with each other.

 

Very often technical solutions (cybersecurity products) are presented as “risk management” solutions without process-related context.

 

Modern cybersecurity risk management is not possible without technical solutions, but these solutions alone, when not put in the context of correct risk management processes (and in the context of information-related processes) of an organization might not be enough to properly manage risks of information processing or might even cause a false sense of security.

 

In this new series of articles, I will explain some basic notions related to risk management, introduce and describe the phases of cyclic high-level process risk management, give more details on each of the phases and introduce the NIST and ISO standards related to risk management.

 

In this article, I will review the definition of risk, goals of risk management and list the main NIST and ISO standards related to information security risk management.

Cybersecurity risk management vs information security risk management

First of all, let’s discuss shortly the difference between “cybersecurity risk management” and “information security risk management”. Before “cybersecurity” became a buzzword, professionals dealing with information security used only “information security” and “IT security” notions.

 

Obviously “information security” is a wider term. It concerns the security of information, stored, processed or transmitted in any form (including paper). Information security also concerns people, processes, legal/regulatory matters and insurance. (Yes, insurance is also a way to reduce risk – by transferring it – and is thus a security measure.)

 

“IT security” is a term concerning “IT”, that is Information Technology. So it concerns information processed in IT systems. Sometimes these notions (“information security” and “IT security”) were used (and still are used!) interchangeably, but formally this is wrong because IT system is a part of information processing system.

 

“Cybersecurity” is a nice buzzword of recent years. Almost everything is “cyber” these days. Unfortunately this word has different meanings, depending on who uses it. The “cyber” part of this word suggests it concerns technology, so in my private opinion this word, “cybersecurity” is a younger brother of “IT security” (or, to be more precise, a younger clone  ). What is wrong with this word in my opinion is that it is often used to describe (or in) high-level documents like policies or process descriptions that have nothing to do with lower-level technology. But this is the trend we cannot change – the “cybersecurity everything” approach has been present in information/IT security world for some time already and it is doing very well. So we have to adapt and adjust.

 

But at the same time we have to be very careful when using the word “cybersecurity” (do we really mean what we are saying?) and also when reading it (what does this word really mean in the context of other information it is “served” with?).

The goal of information security risk management

The main goal of information security risk management is to continuously address the risks to information processed by an organization. These risks are to be addressed according to the organization’s risk management policy.

 

The information security risk management is a part of general risk management of an organization, so it should be aligned with general, high-level risk management policy.

 

The realization of the above-mentioned goal of information security is dependent on the following elements:

  • the information security risk management methodology;
  • the information security risk management policy and procedures;
  • the information security risk management process;
  • the information security risk management stakeholders.

I will be addressing all these in next articles in this series.

NIST and ISO standards

There are important (and practically applicable) NIST guidelines and ISO standards available on information security risk management.

The main high-level ISO standard on risk management is ISO 31000 (namely ISO 31000:2009: “Risk management — Principles and guidelines”; it is currently under review).

(It belongs to the same line of ISO standards as ISO 27000 line of standards, which I touched in my previous series of articles in Komunity.)

 

ISO 3100 introduces the risk management cycle that is applicable to (and should be used for) information security management, independent of risk analysis methodology used. I will use this cycle to introduce information security risk management process.

But before that, let me mention also other standards and guidelines on information security risk management:

  • ISO/IEC 27005: “Information technology — Security techniques — Information security risk management”;
  • NIST Special Publication 800-39: “Managing Information Security Risk: Organization, Missions and Information System View”;
  • NIST Special Publication 800-30 Rev 1: “Guide for Conducting Risk Assessments”.

I will come back to these standards after I describe the risk management cycle and its elements.

Risk definition

Let’s touch on another subject that is important and sometimes misunderstood – the notion of risk itself.

 

In common language, we often mix up all notions related to risk management: the risk itself, vulnerability, threat etc. We can’t do that if we want to run the risk management properly. It is not only the matter of notion mix-up. These notions are used in any risk analysis methodology and shouldn’t be mixed up, otherwise one will not be able to perform risk analysis correctly or understand and implement its results into the risk management process cycle.

 

ISO 31000 defines risk as “effect of uncertainty on objectives” (please remember that this standard is a high-level standard). This effect can be positive or negative, which means that in terms of this standard (and other risk-related standards, as you will see) risk is neutral. This, as can easily be seen, is not consistent with the common language, in which risk is almost always a negative notion.

 

I’ll come back to this definition and to the definitions o terms that are related to risk notion: vulnerability, threat etc.

Technical Dr. Inc.s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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