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The digital hospital: Streamlining workflow to improve care

The digital hospital: Streamlining workflow to improve care | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

Hospitals are complex ecosystems with hundreds of clinical and business processes. In this guest post, Brendan Ziolo, head of large enterprise strategy at an IP networking, ultra-broadband access and cloud technology company, gives hospital executives a glimpse at how digitization and automation of processes are key to streamlining workflows to enable providers to spend less time on non-care related tasks and more time on patients.

 

Patient care teams handle multiple patients and care management tasks. The result is a multifaceted web of workflows that can be prone to decision bottlenecks or missed/delayed tasks that can impact patient safety and care quality.

If properly integrated and automated, these processes have the potential to seamlessly unite patients, doctors, staff, assets and information throughout the hospital.

Digital strategy

But, it’s not just about adopting new technology; hospitals must have a clear digital strategy across their entire organization and IT infrastructure. To become a digital hospital, processes must be streamlined and reengineered to create paperless automated digital workflows.

Many functions within hospitals are already on their way to becoming digital. For example, electronic health records (EHRs) are being widely implemented to help track patient health data and support medical decisions. Digital medical imaging systems are quickening the process of reviewing medical images by physicians and other healthcare professionals.

Hospitals are extending workflow through mobile health (mHealth) initiatives, which enable physicians and patients to use mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets to record and find the right information and resources anytime from any location. In fact, according to the 2014 HIMSS Analytics Mobile Devices Study, more than half of U.S. hospitals are using smartphones and/or tablets and 69% of clinicians are using both a desktop/laptop and a smartphone/tablet to access information.

In addition, hospitals are eliminating distance barriers with telemedicine through the use of network and communication technologies to provide broader access to standard or specialized care, regardless of location. Other functions and processes that are being digitized and automated include delivery robots that can handle a number of fetch-and-deliver tasks, and real-time location systems (RTLS) are used to locate equipment, patients and staff.

Duplication of processes

Progress is being made, yet most digital information and processes in hospitals reside in disparate systems or devices that must be interconnected and integrated to truly improve workflow and quality care. Duplication of information and processes must be avoided to eliminate unintended consequences.

Often you can find staff doing double data entry or pulling information from different systems, and jumping through hoops to pull together the knowledge required for the best patient care. There are many tasks throughout the hospital that staff spend time on every day just to get their jobs done. The goal in a digital hospital is to automate as many of these tasks as possible to improve staff efficiency, information accuracy and overall cost savings.

By standardizing procedures and breaking down processes into their component parts, digitizing, connecting and analyzing them, hospitals can realize unprecedented efficiency. Once processes are well understood, technology solutions can be leveraged to streamline these processes and integrate disparate elements. Essential to this integration is the information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure that interconnects all aspects of care delivery and hospital administration.

The big picture

The use of mobile, cloud and new communication technologies can create a platform that can capture data from disparate sources, such as EHRs, wearables, clinical information systems, mobile devices and more.

Pull it all together and a caregiver is given a holistic and real-time view of a patient’s health on any device that is accessible to the patient, or other specialists as needed, for the best ongoing care.

This is just one view of how a digital workflow could look and the impact it might have on both the patient and provider. But it’s clear that the only way healthcare providers can meet the growing expectations of the healthcare consumer is with a streamlined, digital workflow that not only improves care but still meets critical compliance and security regulations.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
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Barbara Lond's curator insight, December 22, 2017 3:42 PM
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
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Four Unique Healthcare Apps

Four Unique Healthcare Apps | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

The last seven years has seen the rise of the smartphone and tablet as personal technology devices utilized by almost all professions in some capacity or another. The healthcare industry is no different and the veritable volume of applications or "apps" that have been developed and utilized by physicians and patients in the last few years has skyrocketed. Inevitably, the large volume of apps makes it difficult for individuals looking to make an impact to stand out in the crowd, as certain conventions become standard. Having a unique "hook" definitely helps to boost such apps into the spotlight, but it also serves to help physicians and patients look at new ways to utilize software (and the devices they run on).


CARROT Fit


Sometimes, "unconventional" is as simple as looking at something in a different or even humorous way. For example, CARROT Fit is an app developed by Brian Mueller that provides you with a sarcastic and merciless "fitness overlord" (modeled after his mother, sister, and wife) who motivates you through such innovative techniques as referring to you as "meatbag" and threatening you with "squirrel attacks" (yes, you read that right) when you fail to exercise. Mueller started out by writing alarm clock and to-do apps and received such a positive response about the personality of the Carrot A.I. (artificial intelligence) that a workout app seemed like the next logical step.


'"The CARROT series of apps are all about taking things that people hate doing … and making them fun and rewarding," said Mueller. "I think most people feel upset when they step on a scale … but CARROT's humor turns that around and makes it a positive experience they can laugh about — and because they connect with the character so much, they're actually motivated to do better the next day."


Bowel Mover Pro and Autism Tracker Pro


Another way to stand out in a field of "me too" health apps is to focus on areas of health that may be less common or more challenging to discuss. Case in point is developer Uwe Heiss. His company, Track & Share, developed Bowel Mover Pro and Autism Tracker Pro to empower patients with self-tracking tools that would make the patient-care team encounter more effective.


Any physician who has ever had to discuss bowel habits with an IBS patient knows how frustrating it can be to get vague feedback on patient symptoms. "All of my apps are designed to help people to spot trends, patterns, and how things might be related to each other," said Heiss. "For example, 'Does stress appear to aggravate my IBS symptoms?' 'Since I started Yoga, did my daily average stress level go down?' 'Was I able to avoid peak stress …?'"


Heiss stresses that three things which guided the design of his apps were the ability to highly customize what patients tracked, to provide powerful graphing options to identify patterns over time, and the ability to share data via external tools such as Excel, increasing the physician's ability to use the data in a meaningful way.


Symple


Developer Natasha Gajewski echoes some of these thoughts and developed her symptom-tracking app around one basic concept that also gave the app its name, "Symple." "I developed this app when I became a patient … one of my most important duties was to deliver an accurate symptom history between doctor visits," she said. "I had limited use of my hands and fingers … so I designed the touch interactions to be as simple as possible. We also worked hard to keep the cognitive load to a minimum."


One thing is certain. Regardless of the reason for defying convention, all developers believe the future of medicine will involve more integration of such apps and more active user interaction in an effort to enhance the patient-doctor encounter. At the end of the day, if visionaries succeed in this lofty endeavor, it will be because of the conventions they chose to modify or ignore in an effort to stand out and stand up for a better healthcare experience.

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Why mHealth and Patient Engagement are Critical to the Future of Healthcare

Why mHealth and Patient Engagement are Critical to the Future of Healthcare | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

In the health IT industry, a lot of the focus on mobile health (mHealth) lies on the provider side—specifically how digital health tools are helping clinicians be more “mobile” within their workflows. In fact, this was precisely what HCI Senior Contributing Editor David Raths wrote about in this year’s Top Ten Tech Trends. This perspective is undoubtedly exciting and fascinating, and worth a read if you haven’t seen it already. But there’s another angle to mobile computing that has perked my interest lately—that being the care management side to mobile health tools, and how patients, in addition to providers, are using these technologies to improve their care.


Indeed, for the May/June issue of Healthcare Informatics, I wrote a fairly lengthy feature (now online!) on how mHealth tools are paving the way for better chronic care management. While doing my research for the story, I quickly noticed three important trends: First, the level of significance that provider organizations are putting on patient engagement shows how they are increasingly willing to adapt to the way healthcare is changing; Second, much of this engagement is starting to be done via mobile technologies; and Third, while the era of patient-generated health data (PGHD) is upon us, plenty of work is still needed for this type of data to be integrated into electronic health records (EHRs).


Regarding the first point,  as I wrote in the feature, according to findings of the 26th Annual HIMSS Leadership Survey, sponsored by the Chicago-based Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) and released at the annual HIMSS conference this past April, “patient satisfaction, patient engagement, and quality of care improvement have raced to the top of healthcare CIOs’ and senior IT executives’ agendas in the past year, a stark change from previous years which found that health IT leaders were more focused on business and financial goals. Nonetheless, it’s been a struggle for physicians to truly engage their patients, especially the 45 percent of U.S. adults with at least one chronic condition, and particularly in underserved populations.”…As such, “another recent survey from HIMSS found that more than 90 percent of survey respondents are utilizing mobile devices within their organizations to engage patients in their care.”


Certainly, healthcare delivery is no longer limited to face-to-face encounters between patients and providers, a concept that has been pushed by the federal government when you consider their recent meaningful use Stage 3 proposals. In practice, there is clear evidence that mHealth tools can be effective for chronic disease management—a HIMSScase study gives an example of how this can happen in the real word. In Sacramento, Calif., a mother posts the results of her son’s latest round of treatment for neuroblastoma on a protected social network website. More than 2,500 miles away in North Carolina, a man who has been struggling to control his diabetes receives a text message from a health coach about a recent spike in his blood sugar level and asks what he ate for breakfast. Every day, from every corner of the United States, people are turning to mobile technologies to help them understand, manage and cope with chronic illness. According to the Pew Research Internet Project, 72 percent of Internet users look online for health information and one in three cell phone owners have used their phone to access health information.


Leading provider organizations such as Duke Medicine and Stanford Health Care are following this trend, using mobile tools to improve care, both of which I wrote about in the feature. Another innovative patient care organization, the New York City-based Mount Sinai Hospital and LifeMap Solutions, also in New York, recently announced the launch of a large-scale medical research study that uses Apple’s  ResearchKit to help individuals who suffer from asthma to participate in studies right from their iPhone.  The Asthma Health app is designed to facilitate asthma patient education and self-monitoring, promote positive behavioral changes, and reinforce adherence to treatment plans according to current asthma guidelines. The study tracks symptom patterns in an individual and potential triggers for these exacerbations so that researchers can learn new ways to personalize asthma treatment, officials say.


While Duke and Stanford have been slowly progressing with integrating this data into EHRs, in a recent interview, Yvonne Chan, M.D., Ph.D., director of personalized medicine and digital health at the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology at Mount Sinai, told me that the Asthma Health app is in the research phase now and that when it comes to care management, it’s important to take baby steps. “This is the very first step. We are essentially collecting information, developing algorithms, and the next phase is further validated before you can start providing actual medical management feedback,” she said. “Integrating this into the EHR is something we definitely want to do down the road.”


Even the organizations that are incorporating patient-generated data into EHRs are doing it slowly, with plenty of challenges. Still, the market for wearable technologies continues to grow with a seemingly limitless future— market researcher Visiongain recently assessed that the value of the global wearables technology market will reach $16.1 billion by the end of this year. Other analysts predict that the wearables market will grow tenfold to $50 billion over the next three to five years.

And for certain healthcare organizations, the opportunities to leverage the wearable data go beyond just tracking. Nick Reddy, senior vice president of information system investments at the Dallas-based Baylor Scott & White Health, touches on this point in an interview featured in this year’s Top Ten Tech Trends on consumer-generated data. “The prevention side of healthcare is where the clinically-relevant things are happening, compared to just the 10 steps that are tracked by a wearable device. “We want to spin business intelligence and analytics on it,” Reddy said. “If you’re a diabetic and you haven’t been walking your steps or taking your [metmorfin], let’s flag you so your case manager can intervene. That’s where our roadmap is taking us,” Reddy said, referring to the Baylor Scott & White Quality Alliance (BSWQA), a 3,700 physician-strong network that is one of the largest accountable care organizations (ACOs) in the country.


At the core of all of this—patient engagement, mHealth tools, and EHR integration—is one very important factor: the patient, or as some now call us, the “consumer.” Are we ready for this type of engagement and activeness in our own care to be able to lower costs and improve health outcomes through the use of mobile tools? I think we’re certainly on the way there—and if you look at how the federal government wants to shape the healthcare industry—we better be.

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A Hospital Is Already Giving Apple Watch To Its Patients

A Hospital Is Already Giving Apple Watch To Its Patients | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

The Apple Watch began arriving in homes and businesses across America on Friday.


And in New Orleans, one doctor immediately strapped it to his patient’s wrist.


“We need to fundamentally change behavior,” says that doctor — Richard Milani. “And the Apple Watch has the potential to [do] it.”

Milani is the Chief Clinical Transformation Officer at Ochsner Health System, and overseeing what the hospital calls a first-of-its-kind trial: Giving Apple Watch to patients who struggle with high blood pressure, and seeing if it prompts them to take their medication, to make positive changes in lifestyle, and simply, to just get up and move around.


And Milani believes that the potential opportunity is huge: More than 80% of U.S. health care spending goes toward chronic disease. And many of those diseases are exceedingly preventable.


Apple Watch part of Ochsner’s broader strategy

While it doesn’t have the national profile of some health systems, Ochsner has been working hard to be a leader in digital medicine.


  • More than a year ago, the hospital launched an “O Bar” — deliberately modeled on Apple’s Genius Bar — to help patients pick through the thousands of health and wellness apps available to them.
  • Six months ago, Ochsner became the first hospital to integrate its Epic electronic health record system with Apple’s HealthKit software.
  • And in February, Ochsner launched its “Hypertension Digital Medicine Program,” a pilot program where several hundred patients regularly measure their own blood pressure and heart rate ratings using wireless cuffs, which then send that data through Apple’s HealthKit (and collects it in their medical records). Based on the results, Ochsner staff then make real-time adjustments to the patients’ medication and lifestyle.


The new Apple Watch trial builds off the hospital’s existing digital medicine program, Milani says. And he began Friday’s pilot with his longtime patient Andres Rubiano, a 54-year-old who’s spent the past twenty years trying to manage his chronic hypertension.

Rubiano says that his two months participating in Ochsner’s digital medicine program have been “comforting” — he enjoys the constant monitoring — and have already led him to make changes in diet and exercise.

“It’s been a life-changer for me,” he says.

But the Apple Watch has the potential to go further. Its customized alerts and prompts encourage immediate interventions. When we spoke on Friday afternoon, just six hours or so after he began wearing the Apple Watch, Rubiano raved about the subtle taps on his wrist.

“It’s like I have Milani as my buddy right next to me,” Rubiano said, “just nudging me to get up off your [behind] and walk around, or saying, hey, take your meds.”

Milani acknowledges there’s limited evidence that wearable technologies can directly lead to the health improvements he’s hoping to see.


But he plans to quickly enroll about two dozen patients in his Apple Watch trial, in order to begin collecting data on whether the Watch is actually making a difference. (Other patients in the hypertension program will act as the control group.) And he’s optimistic that wearable technology will pay dividends in health.

“For whatever reason, health care doesn’t do a very good job of creating [the necessary] behavior change,” Milani says. “But many of these new technologies have that ability.”

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Samsung and Fitbit currently leading wearables markets

Samsung and Fitbit currently leading wearables markets | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

With the Apple Watch launch, and its potential to upend the wearables market, a few months away, Canalys reports that the current market leader for “smart wearable bands” — any wristworn device that can run third-party applications — is Samsung. Meanwhile, the “basic wearable band” market, which Canalys defines as wearables that can’t run apps, is still led by Fitbit.

The up-and-comer in the non-smartwatch wearable market is Xiaomi, whose focus on the Chinese market and low price point have catapulted it into the spotlight. It has shipped more than a million Mi Bands, 103,000 of those on the first day. 

“Though the Mi Band is a lower-margin product than competing devices, Xiaomi entered the wearables market with a unique strategy, and its shipment volumes show how quickly a company can become a major force in a segment based solely on the size of the Chinese market,” analyst Jason Low said in a statement.

Canalys didn’t share the total shipment numbers for basic bands, but said 4.6 million smart bands shipped in 2014, only 720,000 of which were Android Wear. Of those, Motorola led the market with its Moto 360.  Samsung led the smart band segment overall, owing to the wide range of devices the company has available.

“‘Samsung has launched six devices in just 14 months, on different platforms and still leads the smart band market,” VP and principal analyst Chris Jones said in a statement. “But it has struggled to keep consumers engaged and must work hard to attract developers while it focuses on [operating system] Tizen for its wearables.”

Canalys predicts Apple’s entry into the market will blow up the category, and says the device’s battery life will be the main advantage over Android Wear to begin with.

“Apple made the right decisions with its WatchKit software development kit to maximize battery life for the platform, and the Apple Watch will offer leading energy efficiency,” analyst Daniel Matte said in a statement. “Android Wear will need to improve significantly in the future, and we believe it will do so.”


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Cheryl Palmer's curator insight, February 19, 2015 7:06 PM

WEARABLES - Market report summary on the current (Feb 2015) state of the wearables market with link to data source.  Useful to get insight into where major players are focusing their development dollars.

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2014 - A milestone year for digital health

2014 - A milestone year for digital health | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

Both Apple and Google have vested interests in digital health but who will win?

It’s an exciting time in digital health right now. The industry is going mainstream, becoming more consumer focused and large well-known multinational corporations are beginning to put the necessary infrastructure in place to capitalize on the oncoming digital health revolution.

These are the cash-rich forward-thinking companies that, over the last fifteen years, have changed the way we interact with technology and, perhaps more importantly, change the way we live our lives forever. They’re about to do the same all over again but in a deeper and more personal way.

Which companies am I describing? Apple and Google of course.

Both tech giants have been on a hiring and acquiring spree in the last couple of years and both are bringing in the necessary talent, expertise and IP to take digital health in to the home and the body. Both Apple and Google and their iOS and Android mobile operating systems stand to benefit from digital health profoundly so it’s little wonder why both companies are investing in this space.

They aren’t the only tech companies investing in digital health of course but Apple and Google are investing in it in a much deeper way, particularly Google that has made a string of acquisitions in the last year. Before we look at these though, let’s take a look at the movements in digital health among other well-known consumer companies.

While it’s great to see the technology behemoths above looking at digital health seriously they fade in to comparison in terms of what Apple and Google are doing in the space. Let’s take a look at both companies.



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Digital health in 2015: What's hot and what's not?

Digital health in 2015: What's hot and what's not? | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

I think it’s fair to say that digital health is warming up. And not just in one area. The sheer number and variety of trends are almost as impressive as the heat trajectory itself. The scientist in me can’t help but make the connection to water molecules in a glass — there may be many of them, but not all have enough kinetic energy to ascend beyond their liquid state. The majority are doomed to sit tight and get consumed by a thirsty guy with little regard for subtle temperature changes.


With this in mind, let’s take a look at which digital health trends seem poised to break out in 2015, and which may be fated to stay cold in the glass. As you read, keep in mind that this assessment is filtered through my perspective of science, medicine, and innovation. In other words, a “cold” idea could still be hot in other ways.

Collaboration is hot, silos are not. Empowerment for patients and consumers is at the heart of digital health. As a result, the role of the doctor will shift from control to collaboration. The good news for physicians is that the new and evolved clinician role that emerges will be hot as heck. The same applies to the nature of innovation in digital health and pharma. The lone wolf is doomed to fail, and eclectic thinking from mixed and varied sources will be the basis for innovation and superior care.

Scanners are hot, trackers are not. Yes, the tricorder will help redefine the hand-held tool for care. From ultrasound to spectrometry, the rapid and comprehensive assimilation of data will create a new “tool of trade” that will change the way people think about diagnosis and treatment. Trackers are yesterday’s news stories (and they’ll continue to be written) but scanners are tomorrow headlines.

Rapid and bold innovation is hot, slow and cautious approaches are not. Innovators are often found in basements and garages where they tinker with the brilliance of what might be possible. Traditionally, pharmaceutical companies have worked off of a different model, one that offers access and validation with less of the freewheeling spirit that thrives in places like Silicon Valley. Looking ahead, these two styles need to come together. The result, I predict, will be a digital health collaboration in which varied and conflicting voices build a new health reality.

Tiny is hot, small is not. Nanotechnology is a game-changer in digital health. Nanobots, among other micro-innovations, can now be used to continuously survey our bodies to detect (and even treat) disease. The profound ability for this technology to impact care will drive patients to a new generation of wearables (scanners) that will offer more of a clinical imperative to keep using them.

Early is hot, on-time is not. Tomorrow’s technology will fuel both rapid detection and the notion of “stage zero disease.” Health care is no longer about the early recognition of overt signs and symptoms, but rather about microscopic markers that may preempt disease at the very earliest cellular and biochemical stages.

Genomics are hot, empirics are not. Specificity — from genomics to antimicrobial therapy — will help improve outcomes and drive costs down. Therapy will be guided less and less by statistical means and population-based data and more and more by individualized insights and agents.

AI is hot, data is not. Data, data, data. The tsunami of information has often done more to paralyze us than provide solutions to big and complex problems. From wearables to genomics, that part isn’t slowing down, so to help us manage it, we’ll increasingly rely on artificial intelligence systems. Keeping in mind some of the inherent problems with artificial intelligence, perhaps the solution is less about AI in the purest sense and more around IA — intelligence augmented. Either way, it’s inevitable and essential.

Cybersecurity is hot, passwords are not. As intimate and specific data sets increasingly define our reality, protection becomes an inexorable part of the equation. Biometric and other more personalized and protected solutions can offer something that passwords just can’t.

Staying connected is hot, one-time consults are not. Medicine at a distance will empower patients, caregivers, and clinicians to provide outstanding care and will create significant cost reductions. Telemedicine and other online engagement tools will emerge as a tool for everything from peer-to-peer consultation in the ICU to first-line interventions.

In-home care is hot, hospital stays are not. “Get home and stay home” has always been the driving care plan for the hospitalized patient. Today’s technology will help provide real-time and proactive patient management that can put hospital-quality monitoring and analytics right in the home. Connectivity among stakeholders (family, EMS, and care providers) offers both practical and effective solutions to care.

Cost is hot, deductibles are not. Cost will be part of the “innovation equation” that will be a critical driver for market penetration. Payers will drive trial (if not adoption) by simply nodding yes for reimbursement. And as patients are forced to manage higher insurance deductibles, options to help drive down costs will compete more and more with efficacy and novelty.

Putting it all together: What it will take to break away in 2015?

Beyond speed lies velocity, a vector that has both magnitude and direction. Smart innovators realize that their work must be driven by a range of issues from compatibility to communications. Only then can they harness the speed and establish a market trajectory that moves a great idea in the right direction. Simply put, a great idea that doesn’t get noticed by the right audience at the right time is a bit like winking to someone in the dark. You know what you’re doing, but no one else does.


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Why the Apple Watch Left Healthcare Enthusiasts Disappointed, Yet Hopeful

Why the Apple Watch Left Healthcare Enthusiasts Disappointed, Yet Hopeful | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

Rarely are we introduced to something so extraordinarily innovative and revolutionary that we’re incapable of fully comprehending it’s power, while still being left feeling somewhat unsatisfied. For healthcare enthusiasts, however, this was the case this past Tuesday during Apple’s September 2014 Keynote that introduced the world to the all-new Apple Watch.

  


Make no mistake; the Apple Watch is a groundbreaking trailblazer – a first-generation device with a level of functionality unlike anything we’ve seen before. So what’s the issue? It might not seem reasonable that something so unprecedented can leave us disappointed, and perhaps our initial expectations were unrealistic. Yet still, strictly from a healthcare standard, there is more to be desired.

  

For months now, we’ve been hit with a barrage of rumors and predictions regarding the Apple Watch’s healthcare-related capabilities. In June, Apple officially stepped foot into the healthcare field when it introduced it’s “Health” app and cloud-based health-information platform called, “HealthKit.” There is no denying that Apple is fully committed to pioneering the correspondence between wearable’s and healthcare, they just might not be at stage we had hoped based on the information given in the Keynote – although it should be known that Tim Cook, CEO of Apple, did make it point to emphasize that there will be additional features that were not discussed due to time restrictions.

  

As we now know, many of the rumors and predictions we hear about future Apple products are not exactly reliable - look at what people thought the first iPhone would look like. So it really shouldn’t come as a surprise that the watch cannot accurately predict heart attacks, and we shouldn’t be shocked that it cannot analyze our sweat. What was rather disappointing was that for the most part, Apple’s healthcare plans were not discussed at all.

  

During the program, Jay Blahnik, Apple’s Director of Fitness and Health Technologies described the watch as, “a comprehensive health and fitness device.” Judging strictly from what we saw during the Keynote, however, it seems that the fitness aspect is much more advanced than the health side of things. As a result, while many of us hoped the watch would be a more complete medical device, the reality is that it bears a much closer resemblance to nothing more than a high-powered fitness tracker.

  

Based on Apple’s track record from previous product releases, as well as their tight-lipped knack keeping information on unreleased products away from the public, it’s certainly within the realm of possibility that the Health app and HealthKit are much more comprehensive than the keynote led on. That having been said, other than the fitness features, there were practically no other mentions of Apple’s long-awaited healthcare strategy. There were even rumors that Mayo Clinic, who has been working closely with Apple on these products for the past two years, was going to play a role in presenting the health features. Unfortunately, that presentation, along with most of the health-related information, was cut from the program.

  

While the initial presentation on the Apple Watch may have failed to live up to our expectations, one can certainly still see the potential impact that these devices can have on the healthcare industry. The inevitable emergence of wearable devices, such as the Apple Watch, has long been considered to be the next major step in healthcare’s revolutionary migration towards an industry more dependent on technology. Well, here it comes.

  

The sensor-technology that was unveiled during the fitness potion of the presentation will undoubtedly play a pivotal role in the Apple Watch’s ability to improve healthcare. One of the biggest problems in healthcare today is our inability to provide around-the-clock, continuous care. This is where the sensors ability to constantly monitor our vitals can transform the way we collect and share basic information with our doctors. It’s not unfathomable that these wearable devices are capable of detecting early warning signs of asthma attacks, epileptic seizures, and possibly even heart attacks. The technology of these devices doesn’t merely change the way we receive care from our doctors, but our ability to care for ourselves.

  

“The list of features is a mile long, and I’m certain that when developers get their hands on the developer kit, that list will get even longer, and there will be things that we couldn’t even imagine invented”

- Tim Cook, CEO of Apple

  

The future is certainly bright. Were we hoping for more? Yes. But it’s only a matter of time until the Apple Watch is an essential component of healthcare and a monumental influence on our ability to deliver the best care possible. We’re not unimpressed, just unsatisfied – for now.



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Prediction: Health wearables to save 1.3 million lives by 2020 | mobihealthnews

Prediction: Health wearables to save 1.3 million lives by 2020 | mobihealthnews | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

Smart wearable devices may help save 1.3 million lives by 2020, according to a prediction made by Switzerland-based firm Soreon Research. According to the analyst group: “Smart wearables, a set of sensors attached to the body with a direct link to smart devices, are the most industry-disrupting innovation as well as a major opportunity to transform the healthcare system.”

The firm’s lives saved number is mostly accounting for reduction in mortality thanks to wearables employed for in-hospital monitoring, which will likely help save about 700,000 lives of the 1.3 million.

“New wearable technology can easily extend monitoring functions beyond the intensive care unit and alert medical professionals to any follow-on medical problems a patient may develop. Hundreds of thousands of lives could be saved as a result,” Pascal Koenig, Research Director at Soreon said in a statement. “Two other areas where innovative wearable healthcare products could have major benefits are cardiovascular conditions and obesity.”

Monitoring cardiovascular diseases with wearables could prevent 230,000 deaths, while obesity related deaths could be reduced by 150,000. 

“Smart wearables are in a fast-paced, exploratory phase, where the breadth of available solutions reflects their market potential,” Koenig said in the statement. “Soon patients with all different disorders will be using wearables for personalized diagnostics and full-time monitoring. Along with organizing their everyday lives, health data will be handled conveniently via a mobile device. Compared to existing health tracking options, these devices will be life guardians and their adoption rate will be enormous.”

Soreon believes that patients with chronic conditions will help drive the smart wearables market from $2 billion today to $41 billion by 2020.

Another separate report this week from TechNavio predicts that the global location-based services market for the healthcare industry will grow about 31 percent over the next four years.

The firm notes that real-time performance monitoring has become more popular in healthcare to increase hospital efficiency. Doctors, staff, and patients are using all kinds of wearable devices: pedometers, smart watches, and health monitors.

“In 2014, around 10 million units of wearable devices were sold worldwide and this number is expected to grow nearly tenfold in the coming years,” Faisal Ghaus, Vice President of TechNavio said in a statement. “The constant use of wearable devices in the healthcare industry is anticipated to reduce hospital costs by a significant amount over the next six years.”



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Pascal Malengrez e-ssencials digital health's curator insight, January 15, 2015 4:58 PM

10M wearables sold in 2014, i.e $2b moving to $41b by 2020, making preventive medicine soon a reality

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NIH is asking for feedback on using smartphones and wearables to collect medical information

NIH is asking for feedback on using smartphones and wearables to collect medical information | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

The NIH is currently asking for pubic feedback on using smartphones and wearables to collect health and lifestyle data for its Precision Medicine Initiative — an initiative that hopes to collect data on more than 1 million individuals. The NIH’s Precision Medicine Initiative is described as:


a bold new enterprise to revolutionize medicine and generate the scientific evidence needed to move the concept of precision medicine into every day clinical practice


What exactly that means is a bit nebulous, but a New England Journal of Medicineperspective sheds some light:


Ultimately, we will need to evaluate the most promising approaches in much larger numbers of people over longer periods. Toward this end, we envisage assembling over time a longitudinal “cohort” of 1 million or more Americans who have volunteered to participate in research.


Qualified researchers from many organizations will, with appropriate protection of patient confidentiality, have access to the cohort’s data, so that the world’s brightest scientific and clinical minds can contribute insights and analysis.


The NIH is specifically asking the following:


  • Willingness of participants to carry their smartphone and wear wireless sensor devices sufficiently throughout the day so researchers can assess their health and activities.
  • Willingness of participants without smartphones to upgrade to a smartphone at no expense.
  • How often people would be willing to let researchers collect data through devices without being an inconvenience.
  • The kind of information participants might like to receive back from researchers, and how often.
  • Other ways to conveniently collect information from participants apart from smart phones or wearable devices.


It’s exciting to see the NIH see the potential of digital health. They specifically mention how smartphones and wearables can be utilized to collect a wide variety of data: location information, mobile questionnaires, heart rate, physical activity levels, and more.


There is already a robust discussion taking place in the comments section at the NIH website, and we encourage our readers to contribute.

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Richard Platt's curator insight, July 30, 2015 7:37 PM

The NIH is specifically asking the following:

  • Willingness of participants to carry their smartphone and wear wireless sensor devices sufficiently throughout the day so researchers can assess their health and activities.
  • Willingness of participants without smartphones to upgrade to a smartphone at no expense.
  • How often people would be willing to let researchers collect data through devices without being an inconvenience.
  • The kind of information participants might like to receive back from researchers, and how often.
  • Other ways to conveniently collect information from participants apart from smart phones or wearable devices.
Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek's curator insight, July 31, 2015 1:31 AM

The NIH is specifically asking the following:

  • Willingness of participants to carry their smartphone and wear wireless sensor devices sufficiently throughout the day so researchers can assess their health and activities.
  • Willingness of participants without smartphones to upgrade to a smartphone at no expense.
  • How often people would be willing to let researchers collect data through devices without being an inconvenience.
  • The kind of information participants might like to receive back from researchers, and how often.
  • Other ways to conveniently collect information from participants apart from smart phones or wearable devices.
Heather Taylor's curator insight, August 31, 2015 10:33 PM

#wearables #healthcare #wearabledevices

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Google health wristband is more than a "me too" wearable

Google health wristband is more than a "me too" wearable | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

Google announced last week that they’ve developed a clinical grade health tracking wristband for use in medical research and clinical trials. In other words, the Google health wristband won’t show up on Amazon or in Walgreens. And that’s one of the most interesting things about it.

News of the device has been widely reported, generally with enthusiasm. Details on the device, developed out of the Google X group, are still scant however and it seems to be in relatively early phases of validation. According to Bloomberg, the device will measure heart rate, heart rhythm and skin temperature. It will also capture environmental information like light exposure and noise levels.


Clinical trials testing the device’s accuracy are set to begin this year with as-yet unnamed academic partners. I imagine, though, that partners in Google’s Baseline project like Duke and Stanford will play prominent roles.


Perhaps the most striking thing about the device and Google’s plans here is their intent to (1) do validation studies and (2) seek regulatory approval from the FDA as well as European regulators. While the field of health tracking wearables has taken off in recent years, we’ve generally been left to speculate on the accuracy of devices like those from Fitbit based on small studies. Most skirt FDA oversight by marketing their devices as intended for general wellness rather than for the management of specific health conditions.


Google appears to be taking a completely different approach here. They are developing a multi-functional wearable that will not only capture all kinds of health data but will also have evidence supporting it’s accuracy. And with Google’s seemingly endless access to information, it would be interesting to see the information captured through this device combined with other data streams. For example, arrhythmia or pulse oximetry data captured by the device could be correlated to air quality or allergen information.


This approach contrasts and in some ways complements Apple’s approach to health. Through HealthKit, Apple created a common language for how health data captured by wearables is recorded by their connected apps and makes it shareable. And throughResearchKit, clinicians can more readily deploy clinical studies using these devices. However, when it came to Apple’s own wearable – the Apple Watch – the health sensors don’t have validation data and avoided regulatory oversight by sticking with “general wellness” as their intended use. Clinical research will rely more heavily on compatible validated sensors like iPhone connected blood pressure monitors.


It will be interesting to see what sensors Google ultimately packs in here. If theirglucose-tracking contact lens is any indication, we can expect some creative & novel additions to this device.

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Baxter's curator insight, August 13, 2015 1:36 PM

Last year when Isabelle (my co-founder) and I attended the Samsung Digital Conference in San Francesco, 'wearables' like this watch and digital health were all the rage.

And they still are.

Our app will help not only users to manage their specific health conditions, but also give these devices more MEANINGFUL reasons to be worn than just collecting data after data after data (how many times do you need to see how far you walked today?).

When these devices pick up a rise in your heart rate/ rhythm and skin temp, they can send you a subtle warning and remind you to breathe. You can then queue up the breath most relevant to your situation (like the interview breath, or first date breath). Your vitals return to normal range, and you're more relaxed, and no doubt you'll perform better in the situation

Breath-Takingly simple practices for every occasion.

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Apple Watch Changes the Health Wearables Game

Apple Watch Changes the Health Wearables Game | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

After months of speculation and hype, the Apple Watch has finally arrived. 


What are some first impressions? How does it compare with other watches, bands and wearables? How will it impact the digital health landscape? (By the way, if you are reading this review for information on how to deliver your one-way banner ads brand messages via Apple Watch, you're already missing the point.)

I have been an avid user of wearable fitness and health trackers for a few years. After losing several Nike FuelBands on the soccer field, I recently switched to the Microsoft Band. Although it's slightly bulky, I truly enjoy the simple interface for tracking my activities, instantly measuring my heart rate and even paying for my Starbucks coffee.

Then along comes the Apple Watch. Of course it's got a great design, but it's not going to be for everyone initially. The learning curve is steep, especially if you're like me and don't take advantage of the online or in-store training. It does have a limited battery life and seems to be missing some core health functions. It might not be ideal for people with poor vision, and it doesn't currently have independent GPS capability. I was particularly worried about whether I could wear it while playing soccer, but I simply placed a wristband over it. Voila! I didn't find a default sleep-measurement function, but I assume that there will be apps to do that. Maybe Apple would rather I charge my watch while I sleep.

It's been only a few days, but I can already say that the Apple Watch experience is a great improvement over my other fitness bands. In addition to tracking my heart rate and how much I'm moving or sitting, the Apple Watch lets me do everyday things like receive texts and email, take phone calls and use Apple Pay. But I'm most excited about how it and other wearables will help me modify my behavior for better health. There's something very motivating about receiving visual and sensory cues from a device attached to your body. For instance, the Apple Watch gives you a nudge every hour to get up and move for a minute. It's very subtle and it may be a minuscule benefit, but it can be a great tool to combat the 21st century “disease of sitting” that so many of us are facing. 

We have been talking about big data, value beyond the pill and behavioral economics for some time. 

These wearable devices provide a great opportunity to do more than simply be shiny objects for early adopters. Wearables aren't just for fitness—they can make a big impact on adherence, compliance and cessation of unhealthy behaviors. 


Two hospital systems are currently conducting digital medicine trials using the Apple Watch to help manage hypertension and to determine how nurses and physicians can benefit from incorporating the Apple Watch into a medical home program. There are already a number of industry-related apps available for Apple Watch, including those from Drchrono, Lark, Doximity, WebMD, HealthTap and others.

The uptake has been rapid: Consider the fact more Apple Watches were sold in one day than Android Wear devices in an entire year. As a digital marketer, don't expect every demographic to immediately adopt the Apple Watch or other wearables. But ignore the Apple Watch effect at your own risk. The impact of this new technology and interface will manifest over time, just like our mobile phones did. 

Remember when they said social media was only a fad?


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Apple Watch Has A Simple Killer App - And It's A Lifesaver

Apple Watch Has A Simple Killer App - And It's A Lifesaver | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

Nearly 11.7 million people have either signed up or re-enrolled for insurance coverage under the U.S. healthcare reform law, more than the 9.1 million predicted by the Obama administration,health officials said on Tuesday.

As of Feb. 22, about 8.8 million signed up in one of the 37 states that use online exchanges operated by the federal government and 2.85 million were in the 14 states, and Washington, D.C., that operate their own exchanges, the Department of Health and Human Services said in a statement.

The Democratic-backed Affordable Care Act, narrowly passed by Congress in 2010 over unified Republican opposition, aimed to help millions of Americans without health insurance obtain coverage. Conservatives criticize the law, commonly called Obamacare, as government overreach.

The online exchanges, or marketplaces, are geared toward those who do not receive insurance through their employer and provide tax subsidies on a sliding scale to make health coverage affordable for low-income people.

In the states that use the federal exchange, called healthcare.gov, 87 percent qualified for a tax credit averaging $263 per month, according to HHS. It said more than half of consumers in states using healthcare.gov bought a plan that cost $100 or less after tax credits.

Enrollment across the board has largely exceeded expectations, health officials said. The enrollment period for 2015 coverage opened on Nov. 15 and closed on Feb. 15.

President Barack Obama's healthcare policy has been challenged in the courts since the outset. In the latest case, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on March 4 and is expected to decide this year whether or not to throw out tax subsidies in states that do not operate their own marketplaces.

If the court rules against the Obama administration, up to 7.5 million people in at least 34 states would lose the tax subsidies, according to consulting firm Avalere Health.

More than 4.1 million people under 35 years old have purchased health insurance through state and federal exchanges, the HHS said Tuesday, about a third of enrollees.


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saturat van's curator insight, March 13, 2015 2:51 AM
Satta Matka 11, Matka Results, Satta King, Kalyan Matka, FASTEST SATTA MATKA http://sattamatka11.net/
Nicole Gillen's curator insight, March 16, 2015 7:58 AM

I'm standing as I type this.  Not!

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How Wearable Startups Can Win Big In The Medical Industry

How Wearable Startups Can Win Big In The Medical Industry | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

As attention shines down on fitness trackers and smartwatches, one of the biggest opportunities for wearable devices remains shadowed in the corner — medical wearables. Medical wearables present colossal opportunities, but they tend to frighten entrepreneurs and elicit polarizing sentiments from investors. As a healthcare and digital health investor, I am often asked my opinion on the subject, and can unequivocally say that I love wearables.

However, that does not mean I pursue every wearable investment that comes my way. The startups that catch my eye meet specific criteria shaped by the years I spent developing novel medical products that the FDA approved and payers reimbursed. When it comes to saying yes to medical wearable startups, here are the key things I look for:

Clinical Endpoints

When considering a medical wearable startup for investment, I focus on what type of data the product collects and if it is an endpoint. A primary clinical endpoint is defined as “an event or outcome that can be measured objectively to determine whether the intervention being studied is beneficial to a patient.”

For example, how long a patient survives is the primary endpoint for most cancer products, and reducing blood pressure is the primary endpoint for hypertension. Endpoints demonstrate that the product delivers value, and most importantly, whether other companies’ products deliver value as well.

Endpoints are not only the source of truth in healthcare, they are also the gatekeepers. Improving a primary endpoint in a clinical trial can unlock FDA approval, reimbursement by payers, and market share when physicians recommend the product to their patients.

For these reasons, a wearable company that accurately tracks primary endpoints commands power in the medical market. For instance, Empatica’s wristband is designed to accurately measure the onset of seizures, which in the long run could determine if one anti-epileptic medication works better than another or when an ambulance should be sent to someone’s home. I’m betting that pharmaceutical, medical device companies and hospitals will pay wearable startups for that type of value.

Aspiring medical wearable entrepreneurs should start by figuring out the strongest endpoints for the disease they want to impact. One good strategy is to look up clinical trials for the last 3-4 medical devices or drugs approved for that disease. Also check out this resource on endpoints from the FDA.

Bulletproof Data Management

Accurate data can be the difference between life and death, which means your data collection methods have to be ironclad. Consumers need to know that they can trust the data from your product, as does the FDA, larger medical community and investors.

Preventice provides an always-on, remote-monitoring wearable that measures arrhythmias outside of the hospital, as well as a dashboard that lets physicians and caregivers know when to reach out to help an individual with cardiovascular risks. It is imperative that the company measures each heartbeat correctly and securely stores patient data in order to avoid creating false alarms or introducing security risks.

Targeting your product to the medical community requires a high bar for how you measure and manage your data. Wearable startups will need to integrate design and quality controls, hire a regulatory affairs employee or consultant, and spend money on legal fees. While these obstacles may seem high, overcoming them means you can sell your product at a premium to medical companies. You have also created a high barrier to entry for competitors. The opportunities are huge, so going through the FDA and selling to medical companies is not a barrier to investment for me.

Designed for Engagement

The reality is that customers won’t use a product for long unless it proves worthwhile. So how do you keep users engaged with their medical wearable? By creating a feedback loop that extends beyond medical benefits. The device needs to be convenient, save time, and improve self-image. Consumers do not like to think of themselves as patients and want to minimize the energy focused on their disease. As we saw with Google Health’s failure, active data entry is not viable.

Aspiring medical wearable entrepreneurs should start by figuring out the strongest endpoints for the disease they want to impact.

Passive data tracking, just-in-time nudges, and clean design are must-haves for medical wearables. Chrono Therapeutics’ SmartStop is a wearable nicotine replacement patch to help smokers quit. SmartStop delivers nicotine in programmable intervals to prevent cravings before they occur. Chrono takes design-centered thinking a step further by integrating consumers’ compliance and behavior data into a mobile-enabled cessation plan designed with guidance from the Mayo Clinic.

The Right Partner

Turning a product into a business is actually quite simple — get paid. The time is now for wearable companies to build corporate partnerships into their business model. Existing medical companies need to keep proving that their products offer reimbursable value even after they complete clinical trials and are FDA approved. Wearables enable them to collect “real world evidence” as people go about their daily lives.

Some companies are even expanding in population health management and healthcare services to ensure their products deliver on their promise. One case of this is Medtronic, which has expanded beyond cardiovascular devices into telehealth and remote patient monitoring services. Its Cardiocom business unit uses a number of wired products to provide telemedicine. Imagine what its platform would look like if it had 24/7 data from patients on key physiologic measures.

The right partner can also help startups by validating products in clinical trials, which is appealing to an investor. For example, pharma company UCB signed a deal with electronics company MC10 to test its “BioStamp” in clinical trials for new neurological therapies.

Selling to the medical community may seem like a daunting proposition, but I believe this is where the big opportunities lie for medical wearable startups. For one thing, consumer-focused wearables aren’t living up to their promise. Research from Endeavor Partners found that one-third of consumers abandon their wearables after just a few months. Clearly the appeal of tracking steps is not enough to keep people interested in these devices.

Furthermore, focusing wearable device development on the consumer market (specifically young, wealthy, and tech-savvy early adopters) means that, in the words of J.C. Herz, “wearables are totally failing the people who need them most” — the old, the chronically ill, and the poor. Medical wearables are one of the rare and exciting areas where technology can have a marked, positive impact on people’s lives while also making big money at the same time. I can’t wait to see more entrepreneurs taking on these challenges.


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jean marc mosselmans's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:07 PM

a true potential and some nice insights with useful clickable links

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Google Glass Startups Claim: Not Dead Yet

Google Glass Startups Claim: Not Dead Yet | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

Last week, Google GOOGL -1.44% announced that it’s shuttering its consumer-end operation for Google Glass. As of this week, the product is no longer available for purchase by consumers. For startups using Google Glass to revolutionize healthcare, that poses a problem, right? You’d think.

Not so, insist the entrepreneurs. They claim it’s good news. There’s still a huge opportunity in the enterprise market – that is, selling these funny computerized spectacles to businesses. Google is still working with a select group of ten “Glass Certified Partners,” listed on the company’s Glass at Work page. Four of them (AMA, Augmedix, Pristine, and Wearable Intelligence) are focused at least partly on putting Glass on the faces of physicians or other healthcare workers.


“Glass at Work has been growing and we’re seeing incredible developments with Glass in the workplace,” Google said in a prepared statement. “As we look to the road ahead, we realize that we’ve outgrown the lab and so we’re officially ‘graduating’ from Google[x] to be our own team here at Google.” That team will be helmed by Tony Fadell, whose last major project was co-founding Nest, the smart-thermostat company acquired by Google last year.

“Our accelerating expansion plans continue,” says Ian Shakil, chief executive of Augmedix, a startup that aims to help doctors automate medical recordkeeping via Glass. “Our supply of Glass v1 remains unaffected. Google’s support is unaffected.”

Just the day before Google’s own announcement, Augmedix announced the completion of a $16 million Series A funding round. But Pelu Tran, the company’s chief product officer (and a member of this year’s 30 Under 30 list in healthcare) said in a previous interview that this was the same path that smartphones followed. “We focus on providing a service delivered via Google Glass and I think that right now Google Glass is doing quite well in enterprise. If you look at Glass as a consumer and you look at what tablets are like and what smartphones are like, if you look at the early days, you see that they started in enterprise. For the next couple of years, that will be Glass.”

Chase Feiger, founder and director of business development at Wearable Intelligence, goes so far as to say the announcement is actually improving business. “Google’s announcement has and will continue to be beneficial to our business,” he wrote in an email, describing his belief that the company’s telemedicine product will improve from Google’s apparent doubling down on Glass products for the workplace.

It’s been hard for these companies to explain to customers that the whole scene isn’t dead yet. “When that story came out, literally 200 people emailed me,” says Kyle Samani, founder and CEO of Pristine, which makes a product allowing doctors to share live video feeds through HIPAA-compliant channels. “It’s affected our business only in that people are like, ‘Kyle, is Pristine dead?’” It got so bad that the company soon put a large blue banner at the top of every page on its website to reassure both current and potential customers that everything will be fine.

Although not even enterprise-end companies know when the new version of Glass will be released, executives from Glass at Work companies say they’re still regularly making and receiving Glass orders from Google. Samani says his company buys the headsets from Glass’s enterprise arm “by the hundreds” on a regular basis. And if these companies’ – and Google’s – claims are to be believed, that trend should continue.


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Wearables will cause data breaches in the enterprise, says Good Technology: 2015 Tech Predictions | SiliconANGLE

Wearables will cause data breaches in the enterprise, says Good Technology: 2015 Tech Predictions | SiliconANGLE | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

2015 will be the year of the smart watch, with compelling offerings arriving on both the Apple and Android platforms. But we will also see popular consumer mobile applications creating huge security issues for the enterprise, with major security breaches happening due to human error. This is all according to Nicko van Someren, CTO of Good Technology, a provider of secure mobility software.

van Someren’s predictions about emerging technologies are all part of our second annual Technology Predictions series in which industry experts share their predictions with us about the hot tech trends that they think will take center stage in 2015. We’ll be sharing all of their predictions with you over the next several days. Read on for more from van Someren.

 

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Prediction No. 1: Human error will lead to more major security breaches

Cyber-attacks are getting more sophisticated and complex. This will continue in 2015 but it appears that many companies are not moving fast enough to keep up and the likely result will be major security breaches. The biggest contributing factor to these security risks will be human error and lack of awareness.

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Prediction No. 2: Consumer technologies will cause security issues for enterprises

Consumer technology will also be a big concern in 2015. Consumer devices and consumer-centric technologies act as a gateway for corporate data to move between controlled, corporate environments and parts unknown. Modern consumer devices are inherently prone to leaks by design because they are built to explicitly make it easy for users to share data. Popular consumer mobile applications can easily move data outside of corporate controls without the user knowing, creating huge security issues for the enterprise.

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Prediction No. 3: 2015 will be the year of the smart watch

2015 will be the year of the smart watch, with compelling offerings arriving on both the Apple and Android platforms. The emergence of new technology will result in the emergence of new security threats and vulnerabilities, putting users’ data at risk. We don’t yet know how hard it will be to break into these devices but we do know that, if hackers can infiltrate your smart watch, then they can potentially make transactions from Apple Pay and, possibly, reach back into the database on your smartphone to capture all sorts of sensitive information.

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Prediction No. 4: Wearables will cause data breaches in the enterprise

As of now, wearables are mainly consumer-driven. Their arrival in the workplace in 2015 is certain but most businesses are woefully unprepared for this. Unless businesses move swiftly to limit how corporate data is delivered to and consumed on these devices, some sort of data breach is inevitable.


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A Turning Point? Wearables Could Save 1.3M Lives by 2020 | Hospital EMR and EHR

A Turning Point? Wearables Could Save 1.3M Lives by 2020 | Hospital EMR and EHR | Healthcare and Technology news | Scoop.it

For years, wearable health bands have been expensive toys useful almost exclusively to fit people who wanted to get fitter. On their own, wearables may be chic, sophisticated and even produce medically relevant information for the user, but they haven’t been integrated into practical care strategies for other populations.

And with good reason. For one thing, doctors don’t need to know whether an otherwise-healthy patient took 10,000 steps during a run, what their heart rate was on Thursdays in June or even what their pulse ox reading was if they’re not wheezy asthmatics. Just as importantly, today’s EMRs don’t allow for importing and analyzing this data even if it is important for that particular patient.

But as the banners at last week’s mHealth Summit pointed out, we’re headed for the era of the mHealth ecosystem, a world were all the various pieces needed to make patient generated data relevant are in place. That means good things for the future health of all patients, not just fitness nuts.  In fact, a Swiss analyst firm is predicting that smart wearable devices will save 1.3 million lives by 2020, largely through reductions in mortality to in-hospital use of such devices, according to mobihealthnews.

New research from Switzerland-based Soreon Research argues that smart wearables, connected directly with smart devices, projects that using wearables for in-hospital monitoring will probably save about 700,000 lives of the 1.3 million it expects to see preserved by 2020. Even better, wearables can then take the modern outside the hospital. “New wearable technology can easily extend monitoring functions beyond the intensive care unit and alert medical professionals to any follow on medical problems a patient may develop,” according to Soreon Research Director Pascal Koenig.

Not surprisingly, given their focus on monitoring aerobic activities, Soreon projects that wearables can be particularly helpful in avoiding cardiovascular disease and obesity. The firm believes that monitoring patients with wearables could prevent 230,000 deaths due to cardiovascular diseases, and reduce obesity related deaths by 150,000.

And that’s just a taste of how omnipresent wearables use may be within a few years. In fact, Soreon believes that patients with chronic conditions will help push up the smart wearables market from $2 billion today to $41 billion, or more than 1000% growth. That’s a pretty staggering growth rate regardless of how you look at it, but particularly given that at the moment, clinical use of smart wearables is largely in the pilot stage.

What few if any pundits are discussing — notably, as I see it — is what software tools hospitals will use to crunch this flood of data that will wash it on top of the astonishing volume of data EMRs are already producing.

True, at the mHealth Summit there were vendors pitching dashboards for just this purpose, who argued that their tools would allow healthcare organizations to manage populations via wearable. And of course tools like Apple HealthKit and Microsoft Health hope to serve as middlemen who can get the job done.

These solutions will definitely offer some value to providers. Still, I’d argue that wearables will not make a huge impact on clinical outcomes until the day what they produce can be managed efficiently within the EMR environment a provider uses, and I don’t see players like Epic and Cerner making big moves in this direction. When the mHealth ecosystem comes together it’s likely to produce everything analysts predict and more, but bringing things together may take much longer than they expect.



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